Satellites

How Many Weather Satellites Are in Orbit?

Weather satellites collect data on a variety of meteorological parameters, such as rain, snow, ice, fire, cloud systems, dust storms, air pollution, ocean currents and more. The data is used by meteorologists and climatologists to monitor current conditions and predict future weather events. There are two main types of weather satellites: polar orbiting and geostationary.

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Weather Satellites Monitor the East Coast of the United States

Weather satellites monitor changes in the climate on a daily basis. They detect rain, cloud cover, snow, ice, sea state, ocean color, air pollution, city lights, and fires. They help monitor the effects of El Nino, the Antarctic ozone hole, and many other events on Earth’s surface. They are used to map the boundary of

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Oregon Coastal Radars and Weather Satellites

Weather satellites monitor the Earth’s atmosphere and climate. They also observe other environmental issues such as smoke from wildfires, volcanic ash clouds, city lights, and more. NOAA recently launched a new weather satellite – GOES-17 – that will make it easier for forecasters to understand what’s happening in the Pacific Northwest. This information will improve

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How Many Weather Satellites Are in Space?

Weather satellites provide real-time images of the Earth’s weather, oceans and environment. These satellites help meteorologists prepare for and respond to major storms, wildfires, ice storms and other weather-related events. There are two basic types of weather satellites – geostationary and polar orbiting. Each can take a picture of the entire globe every half hour.

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Satellite Weather Satellites in Japan

Japan’s weather forecasting technology continues to improve each year. It relies on land surface observation, supercomputers, and weather satellites in space. Currently, two geostationary weather satellites (GMS series) are operated by the Japan Meteorological Agency. They support the country’s weather forecasting, tropical cyclone tracking and meteorology research. Meteorological Satellites Japan has launched a number of

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